The White Water and Miami Turnpike

On 29 January, 1830, a law passed the General Assembly creating a turnpike, or toll road, from the Ohio State line to a convenient point on the National Road. The law specified that said road would connect the “college township” along the state line through Liberty, Brownsville, and Milton to the National Road. The “college township” was known, for many years, was known as College Corners. It is now called Cottage Grove, located on what is now US 27 on the Indiana-Ohio State Line.

The commissioners for the road were designated as Robert Long, Aaron Stanton, Thomas Cully, Ira Grover, Thomas R. Chunn, and William Youse of Union County, and Jesse Willits, Asa M. Sherman and Samuel Pierce of Wayne County. This was listed in the section one of the law. This section also listed that the road would commence “at the north west corner of the college township, on the line between the states of Ohio and Indiana, thence via Liberty and Brownsville in Union county, Milton, in Wayne county, to some convenient point on the National Road.”

Rough route of the White Water and Miami Turnpike.

The new corporation would, according to section two, be able to sell subscriptions, or stock, for the price of $25 a share. The law went on to state about how the shareholders were to elect a board of directors, establish by-laws, and how elections were to be held. It was even stated that no shareholder could not vote in the elections unless said shareholder had paid 10% of the value of the stock.

Section 11 stated that, if found convenient, that the new company could use any state or county road to locate the road.

Ultimately, most of this turnpike would revert to county responsibility. The ISHC would, in the end, only take the sections from the state line to Liberty, and the section from Milton to the National Road, into the state highway system. From Milton north, it became part of the original route of SR 1 in October 1926.

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